musician inspiration

Multiphonics Tutorial + 5 Daily Exercises [Video]

Hello, friends! Here is my first in-depth extended techniques tutorial on Multiphonics! I've included 5 ways to practice them as a part of your daily warm-up! These really open your awareness to your airstream, embouchure, and ability to resonate with space in the mouth, making them great additions to your tone study!


Fingerings Mentioned:

  • Fingering for High D / Sounds High D + Middle C
  • Fingering for E Natural without L1 + TR1 / Sounds Middle E + Middle C#
  • Fingering for Middle F + Both Trill Keys / Sounds Middle F + Middle D

Additional fingerings can be found online via Flutecolors' Multiphonics Finder and the publications by Robert Dick listed below.




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7 Ways to Have an Inspiring Lesson Every Week [A Guide for Students]

7 Ways to Have an Inspiring Lesson Every Week [A Guide for Students]

1. PLAN + PRIORITIZE

At the end of each lesson, a clear list of assignments or goals should be established between you and your teacher. Write them down while you're discussing them to avoid forgetting anything, and be specific! If your teacher doesn't provide specific parameters (Ex: learn measures 1-50, or prepare minor scales, double tongued at MM=120), set them for yourself - you'll have an easier time focusing on tasks while practicing during the week.

Prioritize your task list and look ahead to your schedule to figure out what you'll practice when. Even if you don't stick with your plan, having a rough guide for what you can realistically accomplish each day is more motivating than having no guide at all. 

2. Keep Your Notebook Ready

In addition to writing your assignments down at the end of each lesson, your notebook should be out and ready during your lesson to keep track of important information that you're going to want to access later. I'm always more than happy to wait while my students take notes during a lesson! (It also lets me know that you've processed an a-ha moment when you can put it into words!)

When your lesson ends, add any other information while it's still fresh in your mind. I would walk straight to my favorite bench after all my lessons in grad school and write down as many details and ideas as I could, or elaborate on the fast scribbles I had made. 

3. Practice Well

Practice right after your lesson while new ideas or discoveries are still fresh. Many of my lessons involving changes to my embouchure or physical movements involved a lot of experimentation during the lesson. By the end, I may or may not have fully embodied what my teacher was explaining, so I would continue the process immediately following in a practice room in front of a mirror. 

Practice thoroughly enough during the week to resolve or remedy the mistakes that were discussed at the last lesson. Bringing the same mistakes to your next lesson halts progress. Make new mistakes next time, and you'll be able to learn something new!

4. Ask Questions

Practice sessions based in awareness, observation, and experimentation involve asking yourself many questions! Throughout the week, write down any specific questions you'd like your teacher's help answering. (For example, you may want help deciding how to phrase or breathe in a certain passage, advice on making a more effective subito dynamic change, or ideas for approaching baroque articulation.) Tip: Always try answering them for yourself, and bring your ideas to your lesson.

During your lesson, ask as many questions as you need to understand new concepts from every angle. If your teacher is asking you "open your throat," but you're not sure how to do that, ask for clarification.

Important! You are not a failure if you don't understand immediately after hearing one direction. Ask your teacher to describe their experience in detail, try it for yourself, and explain what the experience feels like for you. Since we cannot see what is happening inside while playing, exchange as much specific detail as possible.

5. Communicate Your Goals

Your lessons are for you! Clearly and frequently discussing your goals allows your teacher to provide you with the right tools at each lesson. Discuss any opportunities (such as auditions, competitions, solo performances, new repertoire...) that interest you. Your teacher wants to prepare you for success, so don't be afraid to share your dream! 

6. Communicate Your Concerns

Your teacher should be an individual you trust and feel at ease disclosing any concerns, overwhelmed feelings, or fears with. Establishing a safe environment to invite honest communication provides a space for effective learning. If you're unhappy with your progress or any aspect of your lessons, respectfully let your teacher know how you feel. 

7. Bring An Open Mind + Open Ears

Remember that each lesson is an opportunity to learn something new! Bring a positive attitude and prepare to try new things. If you tend to feel anxious or self-judging during lessons, notice when you feel challenged and pushed out of your comfort zone, and give yourself permission to be curious and grateful for the chance to learn.

Your teacher's demonstrations are another important opportunity to learn. Listen and watch like a scientific researcher, because their years of experience and everything they're trying to teach you are on display all at once! Even more than hearing how nice their sound or vibrato is, or how fast they can play, listen carefully for how and why they are musically engaging - that is the most important concept that is best explained without words.

In Conclusion

Preparation, attitude, and communication are the keys to highly productive and inspiring lessons! 

 

Interested in Learning more about lessons?

April Inspiration Calendar

How to Use It

  • While this is not a practice calendar, there are several actions that are to be implemented directly into your practice session, such as the Practice Intention ideas.
  • There's no need to do every action in the order specified. If you're one to print out calendars like this one, then stop using them after one day if you haven't done everything as listed perfectly, here's permission to use it however you'd like
  • Half the days are intentionally left blank, and you're encouraged to fill them in with actions that are very specific to your own personal sources of inspiration or goals.
  • The first action involves reviewing your goals, and writing them specifically in the space at the top. Here are mine:

Set New Goals

Take a moment to reflect and check-in on goals, experiences, and behaviors, ask the following questions:

  • Am I on track with my overall goals?
  • Are my behaviors reflective of what I wish to accomplish in the short and long-term?
  • What have I observed in myself that I wish to change?

Last Month's Goals

  • Spend time on my body map, specifically re-evaluating my representation of my hip joints and the relationship of the spine and balance of the head.
  • Use video recordings to evaluate movements and habits in a more specific way to better understand how I'm moving as a whole.
  • Spend time experimenting with throat tension, and learn more about the relationship between the soft palate and support.

How'd It Go?

I set my goals knowing that I would be completely out of commission for two weeks in the middle of the month during my wedding and honeymoon. I did not spend time on my hip joints, but I did have a pulse on my head-spine balance. It helped me with my third goal of figuring out my throat tension. (Read about that here!) I committed to recording more videos of myself, and now that I'm back and well-rested after a busy month, I'm ready to begin putting my findings into action to replace unnecessary habits.

Goals

  • Turn findings from video recordings into action steps. Begin to replace unnecessary habits with efficient movements.
  • Revert to using a timer to focus more during fundamentals.
  • Continue listening to recordings each day that inspire musicality and effortlessness.

Calendar

Click the image or click the button below to download your free PDF!

CORRESPONDING LINKS


#practiceroomrevelations

I am SO EXCITED to see your calendars and the ways you're staying inspired throughout the month! Use the hashtag #practiceroomrevelations and tag @joleneflute to share!

 

 

Why You Need A Custom Warm-Up Sheet

Most pieces have that one terrifying spot. Can you think of the most difficult spot in a piece you're working on? For me, the third measure of the Firebird excerpt comes to mind. Whenever I go back to practicing that excerpt, I spend a lot of time on that spot. There are many other examples of moments such as this that come up again and again. 

If having an entire piece on your stand makes it tempting to jump around too quickly, take just a few of the difficult bars and add them onto one sheet. 

All the hardest spots on one sheet.

Cut and paste or transcribe the most difficult bars from any number of pieces onto one sheet, and get creative during your warm-up! Approaching only the smallest and most difficult chunk each day will slow down the process of learning and refining them in a way that can turn them into second nature when they appear in context. Consider putting difficult excerpts transposed higher and lower on there, as well. (I'm looking at you, Classical Symphony!) Utilize a variety of extended techniques, altered rhythms, varied dynamics, tempi, and articulations... and so on! 

Here's an example:

Important Tip: Make sure to include the key signature!

Your warm-up sheet can change every week or month, or you may choose to create one using your audition or recital repertoire. Since orchestral excerpts never go away and it's impossible to practice all of them each day, a warm-up sheet (or maybe two or three to rotate between) containing the most difficult spots is a great way to keep those pesky runs or intervals under your fingers!

What's on your custom warm-up sheet? Use #practiceroomrevelations and tag @joleneflute to share!

Free Download: February Inspiration Calendar

Happy February! I am excited to share a new resource to boost your inspiration in the new month! If you're looking to have more breakthroughs by changing up your practice behaviors, this is for you. The Monthly Inspiration Calendar for Musicians disperses ideas or actions towards inspiration throughout the 28 days of February, and I have personally utilized these actions to great success any time I have needed help getting out of a rut. (Consider these the "Small Jolts" mentioned in the post on Replacing Guilt with Inspiration.)

How to Use It

  • While this is not a practice calendar, there are several actions that are to be implemented directly into your practice session, such as the Practice Intention ideas.
  • There's no need to do every action in the order specified. If you're one to print out calendars like this one, then stop using them after one day if you haven't done everything as listed perfectly, here's permission to use it however you'd like
  • Half the days are intentionally left blank, and you're encouraged to fill them in with actions that are very specific to your own personal sources of inspiration or goals.
  • The first action involves reviewing your goals, and writing them specifically in the space at the top. See my example below!

Setting Your Monthly Goals

Take a moment to reflect and check-in on goals, experiences, and behaviors, ask: "Am I on track with my overall goals? Are my behaviors reflective of what I wish to accomplish in the short and long-term? What have I observed in myself that I wish to change?

Here are my own:

Observations

In the past month, I have had a positive experience with recording Altes etude #2. I am learning to stay focused, pacing myself while recording these etudes. I have thought about the balance between making an effort musically without falling apart before completing. 

Many times, I felt quite closed or without flexibility. I realize that I have not been breathing fully and efficiently, and the video camera (and long etude ahead) have me closing in and overthinking my movements. I also notice that my articulations are not always as clear as I'd like when listening back.

Changes to Make

In recording etudes, I feel that I can play more musically through making greater preparations and outlining intentions for each and every moment, avoiding questions and doubts creeping in that take me out of the moment. 

I have the resources to remember efficient breathing as I once did, and can spend more time moving and in constructive rest, noticing the involvement of the legs and balance in breathing.

Goals

  • Prepare Etude of the Week etudes carefully, including every breath mark and specific notes on dynamics and mood.
  • Implement a daily constructive rest habit to check in with the movements of breathing, translating them into my practice session.
  • Practice Intention: Allow the ribs to move upon inhalation, and maintain buoyancy upon exhalation. 

Calendar

Without further ado, here is your Inspiration Calendar! Click the image or click the button below to download your free PDF!

CORRESPONDING LINKS

 

I would love to see your calendars in action! Use the hashtag #practiceroomrevelations and tag @JoleneFlute so I can share in the excitement!

Happy Practicing!